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Klubhaus St Pauli

The projected media façade of the Klubhaus St Pauli will offer Hamburg’s entertainment district an extraordinary spectacle of artistic light – and video installations. With the construction of this project hamburg will get a pioneering landmark, a new attraction for the citizens and visitors of the city.

The entire facade of the Klubhaus St Pauli is divided into three areas. The middle area is made of metal plates that will be controlled according to the content displayed in the LED screens. Another part will be designed as a low-res screen, i.e. with a large pixel pitch to obtain a contrast to the third area, which will have equipped with a high-definition display. ONLYGLASS, a German company specialized in transparent display solutions, is responsible for the high-resolution part, integrated directly into the glass panels of the lift. The resolution will be about 1100 Pixel/m², roughly 50.000 Pixel for the elevator facade.

The use of glass allows a high degree of transparency, both from the inside as well as from the outside. While the lift’s passengers will have a beautiful view of the St. Pauli’s center, from the outside the city will enjoy the visuals of a high-resolution screen, capable of showing videos and pictures. This dynamic façade will become an outstanding example for media architecture in Germany.

ONLYGLASS will present a prototype of the Media Facade at the Media Architecture Biennale 2014. We are looking forward to see their technology!

Klubhaus St. Pauli © Klubhaus St. Pauli GmhH&Co. KG
Detail of the glass. Detail of the glass panels © ONLYGLASS, Phographer: Christian O. Bruch
Credits:
Video and rendering: Klubhaus St. Pauli GmhH&Co. KG
Detail picture: ONLYGLASS, Phographer: Christian O. Bruch

Call for projects: Visible city 2015

Connecting cities - Visible City 2015Societal flows and processes become analyzed and visualized on urban media facades through using data which is generated by digital sensor networks and infrastructures that underlie our daily lives.

Challenging questions: How can we make social, environmental and inter-cultural processes visible and use the screens as black boards and visualization zones? What is the impact on the society, when invisible structures that underlie our daily life get visualized? What is the potential to create public awareness?

Call for proposals for the visible city 2015


Our today’s modern cities are hybrid structures in which technology is invisibly interwoven in the perception layers of our everyday lives. With the curatorial theme of InVISIBLE and VISIBLE Cities we want to develop an awareness on the changes which are hardly visible to the eyes and are underlying our nowadays cities.

We call for artistic scenarios to visualise invisible, embedded ‘smart’ urban infrastructures and analyse their impact on the technological transformation of our society in a broad and public discourse.

Curatorial Theme


With the curatorial theme of InVISIBLE and VISIBLE Cities we want to develop an awareness on the changes which are hardly visible to the eyes and are underlying our nowadays cities.

The In/Visible City perspective aims to rethink the debate of visible versus invisible without falling in the trap of focusing on new gimmicks at the expense of content, where drones or QRcodes, VR, phone apps, GPS, Kinect, EEG interfaces, large urban displays, become the core of a discourse, which goes beyond its technological surface.

We call for artistic scenarios to visualise invisible, embedded ‘smart’ urban infrastructures and analyse their impact on the technological transformation of our society in a broad and public discourse. Open or hidden data should be provided a visible layer beyond the aesthetics of data visualisation. Different positions frame this discussion of our future cities within the urban challenges i.e. of climate change, energy consumption and transport systems. We want to approach the In/Visible City through these three main questions:

Hybrid Cities: How can we read and interact with the urban space and which stories / processes are hidden within?
Digital Citizenship: How can citizen shape their digital urban environment and find new strategies for active / critical data collection processes and citizen’s engagement?
Translocal Connectivity: How can we act physically in one place but mentally / emotionally appear in a different place through interactive urban scenarios and various interfaces?

The aim is not to represent reality, but to make a transformative/critical proposal with the question: Beside enhancing and optimizing (Smart City), empowering and improving (‘open source urbanism’), do we also want to explore other approaches, maybe less “useful” but as meaningful; more poetic, narrative, contemplative or situationist? The call wants to encourage projects that reveal new levels of perception to an invisible layer of our nowadays cities.

The In/Visible City 2015 will take place in Berlin, Brussels, Helsinki, Linz, Liverpool, Madrid, Marseille, Montreal and São Paulo and Zagreb. The Connecting Cities infrastructure to be considered by the artists for this Call for Proposals corresponds to the permanent and temporary urban media infrastructures of these cities (see www.connectingcities.net/infrastructure). Nevertheless we also welcome proposals directed to other partner cities of the Connecting Cities Network. We will forward these proposals to the partner cities who might then decide to join our 2015 Connecting Cities Events.

Please submit your project proposal until 31 October, 2014 here. We are looking forward for your projects!

Urbancult – Mapping urban art in Indonesia

Urbancult - Street art in Indonesia © urbancult.netUrbancult is a visual documentation and archiving project that shows the location of street-art works in Indonesia. The goal of urbancult.net is to create a map with the location and pictures of street-art works. Through the map they can keep the public informed about new street-art works, strengthen the community, and show how the murals evolve with the time.

Urbancult - Street art in Indonesia © urbancult.net

Beginnings


The initial thriving force behind Urbancult was Agung Geger and his passion for taking and collecting pictures of murals in Yogyakarta. The project started quite informally in 2011, after he met with Andreas Siagian and got some advice from him on how to upload his pictures and make them more accessible for fans and other street-art artists. This gave origin to “A tribute to street-art murals of Jogja”, i.e. a compilation of street art photographs on the personal Facebook account of Geger. Through his Facebook album Geger enterd in contact with artists, as well as with the community interested in the street art of Yogyakarta.

Later in 2011, Ucok suggested that the compilation should be published on their own web-site. This would make the compilation accessible to a wider audience, as the Facebook site was restricted to personal contacts. Geger joined forces with Ucok to publish all the street-art pictures piled up in their database. They began creating an online documentation and a map with the location of street-art works in Indonedia.

In January 2013 Budi Prakosa (Iyok) joined the team, bringing his experience as creative web programmer in DeadMediaFM, a community develop podcast and online radio streaming of Indonesia. With the help of Iyok the team extended the urbancult’s interface to display the location of the murals stored in the database. Finally the Urbancult was officially launched in February 2013, with the support of Agus Tri Budiarto and Adhari Donora. Later urbancult.net joined Lifepatch – a citizen initiative for art, science and technology, and it remains until now a lifepatch driven project. You can visit the project at urbancult.net.

Urbancult - Street art in Indonesia © urbancult.net

Urbancult’s Credits

Screenshots & pictures: Urbancult.net

Wuxi Tower

Wuxi tower China © Tac - AHLThe tower is located at Taihu Sqaure in the city of Wuxi, China. The media facade comprises 21,000 color pixels, arranged with a pitch of 10 cm. The pixels cover all the six sides of the tower. The tower belongs to the Wuxi planning Municipal Institute.

The technology was provided by AHL and it was finished in August 2014.

Wuxi tower China © Tac - AHLWuxi tower China © Tac - AHL

Wuxi tower Credits:


Images: Tac Lion
Media Facade: AHL

Kim Halskov

Kim Halskov was the senior advisor of the Media Architecture Biennale 2012 and is a special advisor at the MAB14.

He thinks that the field has had a great evolution over the years and he sees the spaces for academic reflection on media and architecture as a great complement for the Biennale. “We have, I think, managed in a very good way to bring the traditional Media Architecture Biennale and introduce a few new things. I think the academic track, the doctoral consortium and the papers are really, -really- a plus for this field”.

The MAB14 promises to be even more interesting as Aarhus will be the European capital of culture in 2017. The city is already getting ready for such an event and the visitors of the MAB14 will have a glimpse into that process. “There will be a really intensive process here with urban installations over the next couple of years”.

The registration for the MAB14 is now open. We are looking forward to seeing you at the MAB14!

Arboreal Lightning

Arboreal Lightning - Art installation at the Camden Roundhouse © Alex Haw - AtmosArboreal Lightning is a large site-specific interactive lighting installation weaving through the architecture of the main space at the Camden Roundhouse.

The installation was created by atmos and it transforms sound and gesture into an undulating, immersive, luminous environment – specifically designed for the Camden Roundhouse. Its activity is generated by both artist performers and a wider audience, creating a performative stage.

Arboreal Lightning is the central piece of the Reverb Festival of Contemporary Classical Music – a congregation of contemporary composers and musicians, with an emphasis on technological innovation. After the festival, the musician Imogen Heap will modify and use it on her year-long world tour. The installation was commissioned by both the Roundhouse venue and the Reverb curator.

Arboreal Lightning - Art installation at the Camden Roundhouse © Alex Haw - AtmosThe project re-interprets the Roundhouse’s clock-like plan of 24 columns by bundling 24 strings of LED light into a large trunk that grows from the stage to bend over the colonnade and arches above. Around 1,500 metres of LED cords have been used to create the installation and each of the 4,800 pixels can be controlled individually.

Arboreal Lightning explores the hidden power of a place – and people. In the age of wireless networks and virtual communication, it seeks to reinvent and re-imagine the relationship between performer and audience, sound and light.

Arboreal Lightning - Art installation at the Camden Roundhouse © Alex Haw - AtmosArboreal Lightning - Art installation at the Camden Roundhouse © Alex Haw - AtmosCredits:
Concept & design: atmos
Pictures: Alex Haw / atmos
Video: atmos
Software Design: Adam Stark
LED supplier: Architainment
CNC routing: The Cutting Room
Microphones: Sennheiser
Technology Support: John Nussey
Maker Space: Makerversity

The Bay Lights – A light sculpture by Leo Villareal

The bay lights. Light sculpture by Leo Villareal. &Copy; Lucas SaugenThe Bay Lights is a light sculpture realized by the artist Leo Villareal that was inaugurated the 5th of March, 2013. The project, called the world’s largest LED light sculpture, illuminates the bridge’s 2.9 kilometers western span with 25.000 LEDs attached to the strings of the suspension cables. The complex installation changes the character of the Bay bridge and turns it into visually appealing structure, that can match the attractiveness of the well-known Golden gate.

From the distance the installation appears as bright, blinking light mass, but every pixel of the LED strips can be controlled individually, thanks to a software developed by Leo Villareal. With his laptop he can change the patterns and dynamics of the installation. This mixture of technical and artistic skills fits particularly good in a city full with start-ups, technology wealth and busy programmers.

The Bay Lights was originally conceived by Ben Davis, Chair of the San Francisco-based nonprofit Illuminate the Arts, which aims to support and create outstanding works of public art. Illuminate the Arts’ mission is to produce and promote innovative contemporary art with civic impact, social activation and global reach to stimulate a culture of generosity, community, collaboration and love worldwide.

The bay lights. Light sculpture by Leo Villareal.
The project was privately financed and its costs are estimated around USD 8 millions. The tech industry of San Francisco donated generously for the realization of the project. Executives, investors, founders and ex-employees of Yahoo, Google, Zynga are some of the persons that donated money for the sculpture. Thanks to their support the whole city of San Francisco can enjoy the installation.

The Bay Lights is scheduled to be on every night until March 2015. However, and due to its success, a fund-raising campaign was recently started. The aim is to overhaul and keep the installation running until 2026. The new campaign is equally ambitious. They need about USD 12 millions to get all the required permissions and make a re-engineering of the system. Hopefully the fund-raising will meet the goals and the Bay bridge will continue delighting the public with its illumination.

Credits:
Project: Leo Villareal
Video: The Bay Lights
Photography: Lucas Saugen

Martin Brynskov

“Media Architecture is a perfect example of what is happening with the digitization of our societies in general”, says Martin Brynskov, General Chair of the Media Architecture Biennale 2012 and 2014.

According to him communication and information technologies were optional, and most of the people still had the possibility to opt-out of using them. With the increasing deployment of technologies in the city -as for example media facades- this option is waning and life in the cities is becoming more and more digital.

Such development still needs to be understood with a mix of competences that take into account the architectural aspects as well as the technological challenges related to it. “Media architecture is this wonderful and scary mix of traditional architecture competences, skills and problems – and something completely different.”

Tesseract – Exploring a cube’s fourth dimension

Tesseract installation © 1024 architectureTesseract is a light installation created by 1024 architecture. It was inspired by the tesseract, a geometrical form often described as a four-dimensional cube. The installation reinterprets the mathematical concept with moving lights that create further geometrical shapes within a cubic structure.

For the installation the artists use common scaffolding structures to build a large cube. The external faces of the cube are covered with translucent fabric. In the inside, a number of robotic lights are attached to the main structure in arrays. This set up allows the display of complex geometrical compositions, in which angles, depth, and movement create shapes in space. The the swift movements of the robotic lights create and deconstruct volumes in the air.

Tesseract was first shown at the New Forms Festival 2013 in Vancouver. It has also participated in the Signal Festival 2013 in Prague as well as in the GLOW festival 2013, Eindhoven.

Tesseract installation © 1024 architectureTesseract installation © 1024 architectureTesseract installation © 1024 architecture
Credits:
Installation, video & pictures: 1024 Architecture

FixMyStreet

Fix_My_Street_01FixMyStreet is a pioneer project of the civic tech area. It is basically a web-application that lets citizens report problems with infrastructure in their city. The reports are then sent automatically to the responsible authorities, who should evaluate and eventually solve them. Potholes in the roads, broken street lights, abandoned vehicles can be easily marked in an online map, the web-app takes care of sending it to the local administration.

Unlike a project like Maerker, FixMyStreet was not started by local governments but by a non-profit organization called mySociety. Thus, the website does not take responsibility for resolving the problems reported, it just creates an easy way for the citizens to take action when they see some defect in the city’s infrastructure. This information is then forwarded to the corresponding authorities, who can process the requests and address the issues reported. The system should also prevent the repeated report of a single problem, streamlining the maintenance of infrastructures in the city. The application is now offered as a service to city councils.

As most of the web-based applications, FixMyStreet works across different platforms: desktop and mobile devices are supported and it can be accessed through the browser or through their own app. Since its launch back in 2007 the project has inspired other projects in other cities in all corners of the world. Similar applications have been created in Australia, Canada, Korea, New Zealand, Japan among others. As the code of the application is open source, other cities have continued its development, adding new features and adapting it to the particularities of each administration. For example, the Norwegian Unix User Group (NUUG) implemented FiksGataMi, adding support for openstreetmaps, and making many improvements to the code.

Fix My Street - Civic technology to report infrastructure problems
Credits:
Screenshots: FixMyStreet